An Insider’s guide to potty training: Installment #5- Let’s Do This

I play the long game as my path to success.

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Photo by Oliver Buchmann on Unsplash

Not everyone can stomach the weekend warrior approach, so here is a viable alternative.

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I potty train by scheduling.

1. The child forms habits that become automatic over time around everything associated with the act.

2. Cuts down on accidents.

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Photo by Derek Thomson on Unsplash

I marry potty training to my daily routine to make it automatic for myself and for the children. By doing this, I take the guesswork out of it and remove the need to think about it excessively.

It goes like this:

Morning potty 8–9 am

After a snack at 10:30 am

After a snack, everyone who uses the toilet is required to do so before we get dressed for outside time. Nothing kills the fun like a child peeing in a snowsuit.

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Photo by DDP on Unsplash

When a child is potty trained, I offer the toilet to them but don’t make them use it if I know they’ve gone recently.

The next scheduled times are:

You can use my scheduling routine or make one that works for you.

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Photo by Andrew Seaman on Unsplash

If sending your child to the toilet as many times a day as I’m suggesting is not practical for you, start with trying one or two times. Marry it to another activity you’re doing anyway, so you remember and consider that a good start. That will be enough to start a habit and get you in the swing of making it automatic.

The key to working with toddlers is consistency.

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Photo by Phil Hearing on Unsplash

The idea is to get them used to going to the toilet as part of their daily activities, so they keep it in their mind until the lesson is internalized.

Other stuff…

Total access.

In the beginning, they often don’t know they’re going to go until it happens. If there is a potty handy, the child has a better chance of success through sheer proximity.

Poop/Pee.

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Photo by Sincerely Media on Unsplash

Some kids learn to poop first, and some learn to pee first.

Every kid is different. Get to know your kid and work with the angle they are presenting.

Don’t give up on a child who seems to have challenges.

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Laziness.

I’ve noticed that lots of children are late trainers these days. It’s probably a combination of comfortable diapers and the absence of the pressing needs that generations of mothers past had.

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Photo by Allie Smith on Unsplash

My own mother had the old school cloth diapers with rubber pants to contend with. The kind held together with safety pins. The kind you had to clean in the toilet every time a kid pooed. Of course, that generation of mothers potty trained hard. These days kids aren’t pushed as hard because there isn’t the pressing need.

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Photo by Charlein Gracia on Unsplash

So take a beat and rest assured that your child will train when they are ready, but if you want to stack the deck in your favor, have a little look back through these articles and see if you can harvest some tidbits to use for yourself.

Written by

Writer, musician, toddler wrangler. Author: “How To Be Wise AF”, a 30-day prompted journal-find out more on Amazon. Contact me at e.king.cooks@gmail.com

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